Boomers, Seniors and Caregivers

***News Releases***

A Caregivers Inner Support Club To Help You Care For Your Loved Ones -- And Yourself

Up-date: Please note that since this news item was released, Diane is no longer a member of the CPCA designation.

(October 23, 2013) - An Internet  "Caregivers Inner Support Club(c)" (CISC), is now in place to help you, the caregiver, care for your loved ones and yourself. 

The founder and director, Diane M. Hoffmann, a Certified Professional Consultant on Aging (CPCA) and owner of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications-Seniors Services, founded the support club because of a need she saw in the cargiving of informal caregivers.

"As a caregiver, do you sometimes feel alone caring for the people who need you most? Then you know that there isn’t a lot of support for us who are currently caregivers, have been a caregiver or will be one in the near future. I mean real “personal” support.", Diane shares.

There is a great sense of joy and satisfaction to be gained by the caregivers in helping their family member or friend, giving them a sense of purpose and love in action. It should be a positive and transformational process for all.

But, there is also another side that can be negative for some people. Caregiving for a family member can also result in many problems. Three factors that have the greatest effect on caregivers' emotional state are, the level of burden, whether caregivers feel they have a choice in the matter and the caregiver's health condition.

She continues, "There’s a lot of government and organization web sites, and that’s great, but you have to wade through for specific information you need which is not always there -- and for real connections and conversations with other caregivers.

"We need conversation. We need to “talk” to one another about personal issues and help one another with support and encouragement."

Well now you can be part of a club of people who understand what you are going through and what we are looking for, because they are also caregivers. It's a place to share, care and network in the privacy of the "inner club".

And all this in the comfort of your own home wherever you live on the planet -- because it is all available by internet.

Members receive weekly articles, tips, news and up-dates on topics and issues concerning caregiving, boomers, seniors and retirement. Once a month a free webinar is offered that would otherwise cost the participant.

Other benefits include access to an exclusive web site for e-talks with the founder director of the support club and other members in real time, as well as a monthly newsletter and special webinars and teleseminars on timely issues.

For more information, visit http://www.hofron.com/caregiversinnersupportclub.html .

- End-

Caregivers talk in Campbell River ...

Up-date: Please note that since this news item was released, Diane is no longer a member of the CPCA designation.

The Role and Support of Caregivers in Today’s Growing Senior Population.

Campbell River, September 24, 2013 – In celebration of National Seniors Day on October 1st, Diane Hoffmann, Certified Professional Consultant on Aging will be giving a free 40-minute talk over lunch on the role and support of caregivers in today’s growing seniors population.

 “Our aging population is considered a ‘phenomenon’ in Canada. The trend is essentially due to 2 factors: 1. an increase in longevity and 2. a decrease in the birth rate. Right now, statistics show that 1 out of 8 Canadians is a senior.  In the next few years, when the boomers reach a peak, it will be 1 in 5.”, Ms Hoffmann says.

Family members in Canada are responsible for about 90% of caregiving. That means most people are cared for by a family member, friend or neighbour – up until it is no longer feasible for the safety of the care recipient. At this point, the elderly person needs to be registered in a seniors institutional facility.

It is expected that soon we will see more seniors looking after seniors. For example junior seniors of around 60 to 75 years of age will be helping senior seniors in the 75 to 80 plus years old. These folks may also still be helping their adult children or grandchildren. The situation often creates a major impact on the emotional and physical health as well as finances of these seniors.

As a whole, Canadian seniors report good health, but studies show that 82% are suffering from a chronic health condition. According to the National Advisory Council on aging 47% have a long-term disability or handicap.

Almost half of the care-help is with “instrumental activities”,(i.g. cooking, cleaning, meals, laundry, banking, transportation, bill paying, etc. The next largest need represents a higher level of care with what are known as “activities of daily living” (ADL), such as: dressing, toileting, bathing, transferring, feeding, etc.

There is a great sense of joy and satisfaction to be gained by the caregivers in helping their family member or friend, giving them a sense of purpose and love in action.  It should be a positive and transformational process for all.

However, there is also another side that can be negative for some.  Caregiving for a family member can result in many problems and challenges such as financial stress, lost social benefits, physical,  emotional and behavioural stress.

Ms Hoffmann wants to help and support the role of the caregivers in these instances. Her talk will take place at lunch time, October 2nd (second) between 12:15 and 1:15, at MacDonalds Restaurant, 1477 Island Hwy in Campbell River where lunch and coffee can be purchased.  For information, call Diane at 250-850-1163.

 -end-


Caregivers talk in Courtenay ...

Up-date: Please note that since this news item was released, Diane is no longer a member of the CPCA designation.

The Role and Support of Caregivers in Today’s Growing Senior Population.

Comox Valley, September 24, 2013 – In celebration of National Seniors Day on October 1st, Diane Hoffmann who ran in the Comox Valley as MLA candidate in the last provincial election, will be giving a 40-minute talk over lunch on the role and support of caregivers in today’s growing seniors population.

Ms Hoffmann who received her designation as a Certified Professional Consultant on Aging in March 2012 says, “Our aging population is considered a ‘phenomenon’ in Canada. The trend is essentially due to 2 factors: 1. an increase in longevity and 2. a decrease in the birth rate. Right now, statistics show that 1 out of 8 Canadians is a senior.  In the next few years, when the boomers reach a peak, it will be 1 in 5.”,

Family members in Canada are responsible for about 90% of caregiving. That means most people are cared for by a family member, friend or neighbour – up until it is no longer feasible for the safety of the care recipient. At this point, the elderly person needs to be registered in a seniors institutional facility.

It is expected that soon we will see more seniors looking after seniors. For example junior seniors of around 60 to 75 years of age will be helping senior seniors in the 75 to 80 plus years old. These folks may also still be helping their adult children or grandchildren. The situation often creates a major impact on the emotional and physical health as well as finances of these seniors.

As a whole, Canadian seniors report good health, but studies show that 82% are suffering from a chronic health condition. According to the National Advisory Council on aging 47% have a long-term disability or handicap.

Almost half of the care-help is with “instrumental activities”,(i.g. cooking, cleaning, meals, laundry, banking, transportation, bill paying, etc. The next largest need represents a higher level of care with what are known as “activities of daily living” (ADL), such as: dressing, toileting, bathing, transferring, feeding, etc.

There is a great sense of joy and satisfaction to be gained by the caregivers in helping their family member or friend, giving them a sense of purpose and love in action.  It should be a positive and transformational process for all.

However, there is also another side that can be negative for some.  Caregiving for a family member can result in many problems and challenges such as financial stress, lost social benefits, physical,  emotional and behavioural stress.

Ms Hoffmann wants to help and support the role of the caregivers in these instances. Her talk will take place at lunch time, October 1 between 12:15 and 1:15, at Serious Coffee, 2760 Cliffe Avenue in Courtenay where lunch and coffee can be purchased.  For information, call Diane at 250-850-1163.

 -end-